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BOMBSHELL! Orlando Terrorist Acquitted Because Of What Obama’s FBI Did…49 DEAD and she WALKED FREE!

The summer of 2016 was a divisive time for many reasons. Not only was the presidential election in full swing, but the issues facing voters weren’t just theoretical political hair-splitting, but more life and death situations. Two of those polarizing issues were (and still are) gun control and Islamic terrorism. Sadly, both of those issues still affect us today and are at the forefront of political debates.

That debate was put into hyperdrive when an Islamic extremist shot up a nightclub in the summer of 2016. The terrorist himself isn’t available for prosecution, but the government has had to decide whether or not to prosecute his wife. The question before the people was whether the other half of the husband and wife team would be held accountable for the deaths of Americans carried out by her husband.

However, now that President Trump is in office, another major issue that has voters questioning the intentions of our public servants is the corruption in the FBI. They are supposed to be the keepers of justice, and yet the probes into their actions are beginning to prove to us that they are more interested in self-serving than serving the people. According to Fox News, it’s once again the fault of the FBI that a terrorist is going free. They report that those associated with the wife of Orland terrorist truly believe her to be aware of her husband’s plans, but since they didn’t take proper records, she is walking free:

“The FBI, already under fire for its handling of tips involving the Parkland school shooter and rocked by the firings and demotions of several high-ranking officials, suffered another significant blow with the acquittal of the Orlando nightclub terrorist’s widow.

And it happened in large part — according to the jury’s foreman — due to the bureau’s failure to record Noor Salman’s interview statements.

‘Any time you lose you need to take a hard look at ‘why did we lose’?’ former FBI Assistant Director Ron Hosko told Fox News, noting the rare terror trial loss should be a wake-up call for the bureau and federal prosecutors to ‘re-evaluate their investigative efforts and their decision making.’

‘I do think it is time because of this, certainly because of some national conversations about trust in the FBI, that the FBI should look hard as to ‘are we in the right place’?’ he said.

After Florida school shooter Nikolas Cruz murdered 17 people, it quickly emerged the FBI had been tipped off twice that Cruz was potentially dangerous, with both tipsters mentioning the possibility of a school shooting. The Bureau has also been in the middle of a political — and potentially criminal — fight amid the firing of former Director James Comey and Deputy Director Andrew McCabe and the demotion of several other high-profile officials.

But what ultimately appeared to have sunk the FBI in this case was its decision not to record an alleged confession from Salman. One of the statements she allegedly made after the shooting that was written down by an FBI interviewer – whose notes ended up being the backbone for the government’s arguments — started to fall apart during questioning.

FBI Special Agent Ricardo Enriquez, who wrote down the alleged statements, testified that he did so because Salman was ‘too nervous to write.’ But the defense – which won over the jury — portrayed Salman as someone who was pressured into making a false confession and had a low IQ, making it easy to manipulate her.

The summer of 2016 was a divisive time for many reasons. Not only was the presidential election in full swing, but the issues facing voters weren’t just theoretical political hair-splitting, but more life and death situations. Two of those polarizing issues were (and still are) gun control and Islamic terrorism. Sadly, both of those issues still affect us today and are at the forefront of political debates.

That debate was put into hyperdrive when an Islamic extremist shot up a nightclub in the summer of 2016. The terrorist himself isn’t available for prosecution, but the government has had to decide whether or not to prosecute his wife. The question before the people was whether the other half of the husband and wife team would be held accountable for the deaths of Americans carried out by her husband.

However, now that President Trump is in office, another major issue that has voters questioning the intentions of our public servants is the corruption in the FBI. They are supposed to be the keepers of justice, and yet the probes into their actions are beginning to prove to us that they are more interested in self-serving than serving the people. According to Fox News, it’s once again the fault of the FBI that a terrorist is going free. They report that those associated with the wife of Orland terrorist truly believe her to be aware of her husband’s plans, but since they didn’t take proper records, she is walking free:

“The FBI, already under fire for its handling of tips involving the Parkland school shooter and rocked by the firings and demotions of several high-ranking officials, suffered another significant blow with the acquittal of the Orlando nightclub terrorist’s widow.

And it happened in large part — according to the jury’s foreman — due to the bureau’s failure to record Noor Salman’s interview statements.

 ‘Any time you lose you need to take a hard look at ‘why did we lose’?’ former FBI Assistant Director Ron Hosko told Fox News, noting the rare terror trial loss should be a wake-up call for the bureau and federal prosecutors to ‘re-evaluate their investigative efforts and their decision making.’

‘I do think it is time because of this, certainly because of some national conversations about trust in the FBI, that the FBI should look hard as to ‘are we in the right place’?’ he said.

After Florida school shooter Nikolas Cruz murdered 17 people, it quickly emerged the FBI had been tipped off twice that Cruz was potentially dangerous, with both tipsters mentioning the possibility of a school shooting. The Bureau has also been in the middle of a political — and potentially criminal — fight amid the firing of former Director James Comey and Deputy Director Andrew McCabe and the demotion of several other high-profile officials.

But what ultimately appeared to have sunk the FBI in this case was its decision not to record an alleged confession from Salman. One of the statements she allegedly made after the shooting that was written down by an FBI interviewer – whose notes ended up being the backbone for the government’s arguments — started to fall apart during questioning.

FBI Special Agent Ricardo Enriquez, who wrote down the alleged statements, testified that he did so because Salman was ‘too nervous to write.’ But the defense – which won over the jury — portrayed Salman as someone who was pressured into making a false confession and had a low IQ, making it easy to manipulate her.

‘I wish that the FBI had recorded their interviews with Ms. Salman as there were several significant inconsistencies with the written summaries of her statements,’ the jury’s foreman revealed in a statement last week to the Orlando Sentinel.

‘A verdict of not guilty did NOT mean that we thought Noor Salman was unaware of what Omar Mateen was planning to do,’ the foreman added. ‘On the contrary we were convinced she did know. She may not have known what day, or what location, but she knew. However, we were not tasked with deciding if she was aware of a potential attack…the bottom line is that, based on the letter of the law, and the detailed instructions provided by the court, we were presented with no option but to return a verdict of not guilty.’

Florida State Sen. Jeff Brandes, who recently co-sponsored a bill in the state legislature calling for a requirement that law enforcement officers record “custodial interrogation at a place of detention,’ told Fox News a change in how authorities conduct their investigations is long overdue.

‘My belief is that in 2018 you should be recording all interrogations, especially interrogations regarding terrorism,’ he said.

Brandes said jurors should be able to see and hear the actual testimony in cases and that he doesn’t understand why the FBI didn’t record the interrogation in Salman’s instance.

‘To me, it’s frankly malpractice,’ said the Republican state senator, who represents part of Pinellas County.

‘How many of these types of episodes do we need before we recognize for virtually no expense we could record, whether the video, or the video and audio of these interrogations?’ Brandes added. ‘Go buy a $50 digital tape recorder and put in on the table and just press play.’”

No one wants to believe that corruption would let a terrorist walk free, however, it’s either corruption or an incredible level of incompetence on the part of what is supposed to be the premier investigative agency in the country. Either explanation has Americans wondering whose interests are being served.

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